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Home Inspections by Dana serving Springfield

35 Twilight Lane
Springfield, IL 62712

217-825-8733

Types of Inspections

Types of Home Inspections:

General Home Inspections: By far the most common inspection requested is the General Home Inspection. This inspection is often called a “Whole House Inspection”. The term Whole House Inspection gives the impression that everything in the home would be inspected. However, that is not the case. The General Home Inspection is a visual/non-invasive inspection and typically includes the roof, attic structure, ventilation, insulation, electrical, HVAC, exterior structure, exterior grading, patios, porches, stoops, decks, attached garage/carports, detached garages, interior room by room review of ceilings, walls floors, doors and windows, interior crawlspace and/or basement foundation and structure components, kitchen and appliances, laundry facilities, baths, chimneys and fireplaces, plumbing, central heating units, central air conditioning units, and the electrical system. Typical items not included in the General Home Inspection, but not limited to, are cable jacks, phone jacks, security systems, low voltage lighting, saunas/steam baths, swimming pools/spas, detached yard buildings and playground equipment. In addition, environmental issues such as mold, asbestos and lead based paint are not included in the General Home Inspection.

Pre-Listing Inspections:
Home inspections have traditionally been for the benefit of the home buyer. A pre-listing inspection is an inspection of a property prior to listing the property for sale. Pre-inspected listings benefit all parties - purchasers, sellers and Realtors. The pre-listing General Home Inspection is typically the very same inspection performed for a buyer, unless the seller only wants particular items/components inspected. The pre-listing inspection will identify issues that can be corrected in advance of a potential buyers own inspection. In a buyers' market, most homes have to be sold twice. It takes a lot of work to get a signed Agreement of Purchase and Sale. Then the home inspection is done and the purchaser wants to renegotiate. If all parties know the condition of the home prior to the offer, there is typically no need for renegotiation. As most real estate agents know, renegotiation is very difficult. Sellers have already mentally sold the house; purchasers are suffering buyers' remorse. Egos, pride and frustration can muddy the already emotional waters. A seller who pays for a home inspection will be further ahead than one who has to renegotiate. They may even sell the house faster.

Benefits of a Pre-listing inspection include:
It allows you to see your home through the eyes of a critical third-party. It helps you to price your home realistically.
It permits you to make repairs ahead of time so that ... Defects won't become negotiating stumbling blocks later.
You have the time to get reasonably priced contractors or make the repairs yourself, if qualified.
It may encourage the buyer to waive the inspection contingency.
It may alert you of items of immediate personal concern.
It may relieve prospect's concerns and suspicions.
It reduces your liability by adding professional supporting documentation to your disclosure statement.
Alerting you to immediate safety issues before agents and visitors tour your home.

Copies of the inspection report along with receipts for any repairs should be made available to potential buyers.

Condominium/Townhouse Inspections:

The Condominium/Townhouse Inspection is simply a condensed version of the General Home Inspection.  Most Condominium/Townhouse homeowners associations are responsible for the "common areas".  Therefore, the "common areas" like the exterior roof, structure, exterior grading, patios, porches, stoops, decks, attached garage/carports, detached garages are not inspected. Condominium/Townhouse Inspections will typically include an interior room by room review of ceilings, walls floors, doors and windows, interior crawlspace and/or basement foundation and structure components, kitchen and appliances, laundry facilities, baths, chimneys and fireplaces, plumbing, central heating units, central air conditioning units, and the electrical system.

Partial Inspections:
Partial Inspections can include but are not limited to the roof, attic, roof and attic, foundation, structure, plumbing, electrical, fireplaces and the HVAC systems.

Mechanical Inspections:

Mechanical Inspections are specific to the major mechanical systems in the home. These inspections typically include the plumbing, electrical and the HVAC systems. During a mechanical inspection, the interior electrical components, baths, laundry, kitchen, plumbing, electrical and HVAC systems are inspected. An interior room by room review of ceilings, walls floors, doors, windows, and the structural components are not included with the Mechanical Inspection.

Verification of Repairs (V.O.R.) Inspections:
After an inspection of a home, sometimes the buyer wants to confirm that negotiated repairs or replacements have been performed prior to the closing on the property. The client provides a list of specific items on a repair addendum that were to be repaired or replaced. The list of repairs is given to the inspector, and the inspector will return to the property and review those specific items listed on the repair addendum. A Verification of Repairs report will typically be rendered to the client describing the status of the repairs or replacements.

Builder Warranty Inspections:
Many home builders provide a one-year warranty for new construction. The builder could be responsible for any defects or deficiencies within that time frame, if discovered and brought to their attention. Many homeowners believe that because their home was just built, there can't be anything wrong with it. That is not always the case. The benefit to the one-year warranty inspection is to correct any defects within the time frame of the warranty and avoiding any future out of pocket expenses. The builder's warranty will typically provide service for the structure, roof and major mechanicals that may require repair or replacement. Many homeowners do not take advantage of their one-year warranty only to wish later they had a professional home inspection on the property prior to the end of the warranty. This inspection should take place in the 10th or 11th month to give you time to notify the builder prior to the ending of the warranty.

New Construction Inspections:
New construction inspections are performed at the completion of construction, but prior to your final walk through with the Builder's Customer Service Representative. It is a good idea to verify that utilities (gas, water, and electric) have been turned on, either by you or the Builder. The inspection should be scheduled a day or two before your final walk through with the Builder. This will ensure that most, if not all, last minute items have been completed prior to your inspection. At the conclusion of the inspection a completed report will be distributed to you.

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